The Globetrotter Cookbook

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Exploring Cannon Beach (+ vegan ceviche recipe!)

Summer has hit Jerez hard, and as I am preparing to move at the end of the month, I haven’t been on any trips in a while in the attempt to save money. True, I could be spending time at the beach, but this pale girl can only stand so much sun.
Confession: I am no longer a food/travel blogger, but more like a “vegging-out-on-the-couch-with-the-air-con-on-blast-and-still-dying-from-the-heat” blogger. Is that a thing? No, it’s not, and it shouldn’t be, nobody wants to read that. So I’ve wandered back into the kitchen, trying to concoct recipes that don’t require turning on the stove or oven.

 

Also while in self-imposed prison, I peruse blogs with authors who are able to venture outside, like Sam from Explore the Map. She challenged me to make a dish inspired by her hike along Cannon Beach in Oregon, which she shares with us today. What better opportunity to make a vegan version of the summer favourite, ceviche?
As an exclusively vegetarian chef, it was important that I get creative, since fish is the main ingredient. Humming and hawing over what I could use, I finally came across a vegetable able to imitate the texture of our underwater friends: Hearts of palm!

Hearts of palm - a ex-fish lover's secret ingredient!

Hearts of palm – a ex-fish lover’s secret ingredient!

This mysterious ingredient is harvested from the core of certain species of palm trees. It’s fairly inexpensive and can be found in the preserved vegetable section of any grocery store.

The ingredients for this dish are simple, and you will be shocked at how similar it is to the real thing! But first to work up your appetite, Sam recounts her beach walk along Cannon Beach.

Exploring the Oregon Coast: Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach

The smell of the ocean washes over us as we dig our toes into the soft sand, letting the waves break over our feet. We sink slowly into the earth, one wave at a time. The sun is high overhead and beats down relentlessly, threatening to burn our exposed feet. We meander towards the towering silhouette of Haystack Rock and enjoy the fresh, salty beach air.

The iconic shape of Haystack Rock is hard to miss. It rises 235 feet above the sandy ocean floor and dominates the landscape. It’s a mere 2.4km south of the seaside town of Cannon Beach, Oregon, which makes it an easy adventure. At low tide, visitors can walk up to the base and explore the colourful tidepools where fascinating ocean creatures live. Nothing can be moved or climbed on within 300 yards of the base because the area is protected under the Marine Garden and Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge. This is strictly enforced because it can take years for the delicate sea life to recover if damaged.

Haystack Rock looms eerily in the fog.

Haystack Rock looms eerily in the fog.

The birds of Haystack Rock

In addition to the wide variety of sea life, Haystack Rock plays home to many birds during the summer.

From early spring to mid-summer, Tufted Puffins burrow tunnels in the soil of the north slope for their eggs. According to CannonBeach.org, these puffins “are squat, black birds with large, bright orange bills, white facial features and tufts of yellow feathers above [their] eyes”.  As one of the most colourful birds that nest on Haystack Rock, they are popular among birdwatchers.

Pelagic Cormorants, a lanky, greenish-black bird, builds nests of seaweed on the precarious narrow shelves above the waves and are often seen with their wings outstretched, diving for fish. The Pigeon Guillemot, a white-winged, orange-footed bird,  is a minority on Haystack Rock and nests only three to ten meters above the waves and is extremely sensitive to humans. Seagulls, Black Oystercatchers, Harlequin Ducks, and occasionally Bald Eagles and Peregrine Falcons can also be spotted on Haystack Rock.

Tufted Puffins at Haystack Rock. Photo credit: CannonBeach.org

Falling in love with Cannon Beach & Haystack Rock

The road into Cannon Beach snakes off Highway 101 and winds its way through the rich forest before quietly entering the town. The streets are lined with cute, white picket homes and quaint, sea-inspired shops. It’s the quintessential beach town. We roll down our windows and let the salty air wash over us, welcoming us to this beautiful town.

We find free parking, but as we step out of our warm car we’re unexpectedly bombarded by a chilly downpour. Jumping back into our car, we watch the rain run down our windshield. Like many ocean communities, the rain quickly dissipates and a stunning, blue sky reveals itself. We wander the streets, gazing in awe at the pastel houses and peeking into the cute shops, wishing dearly that we could live here.

Haystack Rock.

We enjoy the wide expanse of Cannon Beach as we wander towards Haystack Rock, 2.4 km in the distance.

Exploring the beach

After dropping our newest finds off in our car, we wander to Whale Park where a small gazebo and whale statue commemorate this as the southernmost point visited by Lewis & Clark in 1806. The Park offers a great view of the Pacific Ocean and Ecola Creek as it becomes one with the ocean. Families and seagulls play in the Creek where the gentle waves of the ocean won’t disturb them. Located on the northernmost point of Cannon Beach, we cannot yet see the towering pillar of Haystack Rock as we descend to the beach.

It only takes a few moments of sinking in the soft sand before we remove our shoes. The sand becomes compact, almost spongy, as we near the water. We watch bubbles of air escape as waves roll over the sand, sometimes exposing tiny crabs. The sky disappears into the distance, meeting with the ocean and wispy clouds miles away. White-capped waves break along the beach and we stand in their wake, enjoying the cool water as it washes over our feet. The beach is full of people, yet my usual anxiety and itch to leave doesn’t overwhelm me; Cannon Beach is large enough to give the illusion of serenity despite the crowds.

Even on sunny, crowded  days it’s possible to find tranquility at Haystack Rock.

Even on sunny, crowded  days it’s possible to find tranquility at Haystack Rock.

Reaching Haystack Rock

The sun glistens overhead but the gentle breeze deceptively cools us and we’re soon red from head to foot. What starts as a small nub on the horizon quickly gathers mass and becomes the towering Haystack Rock, the sea stack we drove over 1,000 kilometers to see. The tide is in, so instead of exploring the hidden tide pools we settle onto a driftwood log. We watch tiny birds circle the monolith and spot members of the Haystack Rock Awareness Program, a volunteer program that educates the public on the sensitivity of the landmark, talking to people.

Haystack Rock’s creation

Looking at Haystack Rock and the adjacent formations, the Needles, we try to imagine how the landscape has changed. Roughly 16 million years ago some of the world’s largest lava flows ran rampant through the area, forever changing the terrain. When it eventually reached the ocean and cooled, the lava solidified into thick basalt and sat buried for years. The basalt gradually exposed  itself due to tectonic plate shifts and millions of years of erosion. This slowly created the jagged, rocky coastline that Oregon is famous for.

Information & Trailhead Location

There are many entrances to the beach throughout Cannon Beach, but our favourite is through Whale Park.  This way you can enjoy a beautiful walk down the beach before coming to Haystack Rock.  

Distance: ~ 5km (3 miles)

Duration: 1-2 hrs

Difficulty: Easy

Notes: Cannon Beach is a beautiful walk and if you visit at low tide you can explore the colourful tide pools at the base of Haystack Rock. However, it’s strictly prohibited to walk on, touch, and remove anything within 300 meters of the base. Once you’ve explored the beach, wander through the seaside town of Cannon Beach!

Recipe Time!

simple ingredients for vegan ceviche

Simple ingredients make for some powerful flavours in this ceviche!

I’ll admit, because I’ve been cooking for a while, I tend to complicate my life with a shit load of spices and ingredients in my recipes. Well the lazy summer days have hit, and I’m no longer about that. This recipe will take you 10 minutes to put together – no muss, no fuss! Throw the chopped up ingredients together, squirt over a bit of lime and chill in the fridge. Serve with a chilled beer or a frozen margarita and you are good to go!

Vegan ceviche made with hearts of palm, courgette, red onion, chilli, avocado, lime and cilantro

Print Recipe
Vegan Ceviche
This ceviche is colourful and oh so flavourful and you'll be shocked to find that it's completely vegan! Red onion, chili peppers, avocado and a twist of lime bring those familiar mexican flavours and textures to the secret non-fishy ingredient - hearts of palm! Best served cold and with your favourite tortilla chips, and perhaps a frozen margarita!
Vegan ceviche made with hearts of palm, courgette, red onion, chilli, avocado, lime and cilantro
Course Appetizer, lunch
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Appetizer, lunch
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
people
Ingredients
Vegan ceviche made with hearts of palm, courgette, red onion, chilli, avocado, lime and cilantro
Instructions
  1. Drain and rinse the hearts of palm. Dice them up into small rounds.
  2. Peel the zucchinis and chop into small cubes. Do the same with the avocado.
  3. Finely chop your red onion and chilli pepper. If you don't like a lot of heat, remove the seeds first. Roughly chop the cilantro.
  4. Add all of the prepared ingredients into a mixing bowl or large tupperware. Add zest and squeeze in the juice of two limes. Carefully mix together. You can add salt if you wish, but as the hearts of palm are quite salty, this may not be necessary.
  5. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for a minimum of 1 hour or overnight so that the flavours can intensify. Serve with tortilla chips and a cold beer or margarita!
Share this Recipe

A big thanks to Sam for collaborating with me on this post! Check out her post about Mt St Helens where I also contributed a molten nutella lava cookie!

Vegan Ceviche

Print Recipe
Vegan Ceviche
This ceviche is colourful and oh so flavourful and you'll be shocked to find that it's completely vegan! Red onion, chili peppers, avocado and a twist of lime bring those familiar mexican flavours and textures to the secret non-fishy ingredient - hearts of palm! Best served cold and with your favourite tortilla chips, and perhaps a frozen margarita!
Vegan ceviche made with hearts of palm, courgette, red onion, chilli, avocado, lime and cilantro
Course Appetizer, lunch
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Appetizer, lunch
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
people
Ingredients
Vegan ceviche made with hearts of palm, courgette, red onion, chilli, avocado, lime and cilantro
Instructions
  1. Drain and rinse the hearts of palm. Dice them up into small rounds.
  2. Peel the zucchinis and chop into small cubes. Do the same with the avocado.
  3. Finely chop your red onion and chilli pepper. If you don't like a lot of heat, remove the seeds first. Roughly chop the cilantro.
  4. Add all of the prepared ingredients into a mixing bowl or large tupperware. Add zest and squeeze in the juice of two limes. Carefully mix together. You can add salt if you wish, but as the hearts of palm are quite salty, this may not be necessary.
  5. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for a minimum of 1 hour or overnight so that the flavours can intensify. Serve with tortilla chips and a cold beer or margarita!
Share this Recipe

7 reasons you should visit Geneva!

Perhaps since we’re only half-way through the year, the declaration of Geneva being my best trip of the year could be a tad premature. That said, for me this trip couldn’t have been more complete: I got to fill my gullet with copious amounts of wine and cheese, and to top it off, I was reunited with my best friend after two long years apart.

cordoba patio festival

The last time I saw Andrea, at the Cordoba Patio Festival in 2015

A lot of travelers are wary of Switzerland, and with good reason. It’s freaking expensive! Being a budget traveler, this trip was made much more accessible because I was able to stay with a friend. That’s the great thing about living abroad and traveling – you end up with some hot ticket friends in cool places willing to put you up! Because I was able to stay with a semi-local (Andrea is working for the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) for 6 months), I’ve got the inside scoop on how to enjoy the city for less. Get on Couchsurfing to save some accommodation dollars, because Geneva is amazing! Here’s why:

1. You can chill out at the lakeside spa

With Swiss prices sitting much higher than in most neighbouring countries, it’s easy to feel like a bit of a bum when in Geneva. However, even the budget traveler can treat himself to a day at Les Bains des Pâquis on Lake Geneva – 20 CHF in the winter (13 on Mondays) or 10 in the summer months. This price gives you access to 2 saunas, a Turkish bath, and 2 hammams (one of which is women-only). If you’re feeling brave, take a dip in the lake!

Warning: it’s a mixed bathhouse,  so you might will see some very naked men. If you’re squeamish about seeing stranger ding-a-lings, the baths offer a female-only day on Tuesdays.

bains des paquis lake geneva

Due to all the nude men, I couldn’t ethically take photos, but here is the lake where you can bathe.

Afterwards, if you can afford a little extravagance after a grueling day at the spa, indulge in a little cheese fondue. Is there anything better than melted cheese and bread? (Or potatoes if you’re gluten intolerant like my friend)? Yes, there is – pair it with chardonnay and you’ve got yourself an Instagram photo to be envied by all.

Bit pricey, but this is the best value in town – 23 CHF per person, and we splurged 35 CHF on the bottle of wine. Luxury comes at a price, but no regrets!

beach playa plage bains des paquies

Beachside at les Bains de Paquis – Crack open your supermarket wine here and enjoy the sun!

2. Wine, glorious wine!

Tasting Geneva’s best wine at Les Caves Ouvertes 🍷❤

A post shared by Alexandra Ogden (@theglobetrottercookbook) on


It was completely by accident that I found myself in Geneva for the 30th anniversary of Les Caves Ouvertes. About 90 vineyards in the Geneva region open their doors to the public for a wine tasting. It’s a great deal – you pay 10 CHF for a glass (that is yours to take home) and can sample as many varieties of wine as you desire. Rosé, pinot noir, merlot, chardonnay, cava… you name it! If you like a particular wine, they are available to purchase, but for the traveler paying his way on a non-Swiss salary it’s a fantastic way to sample Switzerland’s best wine for basically nothing. The villages are so picturesque, and there are even free shuttle buses to visit them all safely. This event only happens once a year in May, so book your trip accordingly!

3. All the bubbly cheesy goodness!

If you think the fondue should have been enough cheese, you are very very wrong. Nothing can satiate my desire for cheese! Feast your eyes on Switzerland’s most prized dish, raclette:


I’m pretty sure if you don’t have raclette while in Geneva, there’s a hefty fine you have to pay. Could be an urban legend, but I’m not taking any risks.

raclette geneva sardigny

Do you think this would take up too much counter space?

bubbly raclette

Bubbly, toasty goodness!

Served with potato, pickles and pickled onions raclette

Served with potato, pickles and pickled onions. Mmmmmm!

4. Picnic lunches are totally budget-friendly

Switzerland gets a bad rep for being pricey… and I’m not going to kid you, it deserves it. Even a falafel platter at the hole-in-the-wall Kebab will set you back around 20 francs (roughly 18 euros or 20 US dollars). However, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the food in grocery stores isn’t insanely priced. Sure, it’s more expensive than its neighbour France, but you can make a decent meal for a reasonable price. Migros is one of the cheaper options, and a simple picnic-style lunch like the one pictured set us back about 15-20 francs between two people (minus the wine… I saw some wine on sale for 6 euros, but generally expect to pay at least 10 CHF for a decent bottle).

vegetarian picnic on the balcony

Picnic on the balcony: Hummus, olives, wine, cheese and veggies . What more could you wish for?

5. It’s home to the United Nations

It’s been four years since I graduated with a degree in International Studies, but the poli-sci student in me had a little bit of a freak out when I realized I would be granted access to the United Nations. Even if you consider yourself apolitical, I think the UN Palais des Nations is worth a visit. There aren’t many places where you can see such a mosaic of people from so many different places, many of whom are sporting the typical apparel of their country.

Entrance to the Palais des Nations

Through Andrea, I received a guest pass, but anyone can receive a one hour tour for 12 CHF. If you have a student card handy, you can get your ticket for 10 CHF. There’s a lot of gorgeous art to be admired, all donated by different member countries. This one particularly stood out to me:

A gift from Iran to the United Nations Human Rights Council.

A gift from Iran to the United Nations Human Rights Council

This painting was gifted to the Palais des Nations by Iran. The translation is haunting and humbling:

“Human beings are members of a whole in creation of one essence and one soul. If one member is afflicted with pain, other members uneasy will remain. If you have no sympathy for human pain, The name of human you cannot retain.” (Saad, Persian poet, 1210-1291)

Another attraction is the ceiling to the UNHRC conference room. It was designed by the Majorcan artist, Miquel Barceló, and imitates stalagmite rock formations and sea waves, merging two opposite worlds together. Each part is painted in different colours, so from wherever you stand you see the work from a different perspective. Barceló deems it a metaphor for our complex world. A gorgeous, yet terrifying piece, I couldn’t help but imagine that it also serves as a warning to delegates to be on their best behaviour, else a sharp rock formation should happen to fall…

UNHRC room miquel barcelo ceiling

6. Its history is so quirky!

Geneva’s historic buildings are quite unpretentious due to the Protestant Reformation that took place in the first half of the 16th century. Fancy, extravagant churches like those of Roman Catholics were rejected, and you can see a return to modesty in the architecture. Some houses in the old quarter don’t even have shutters to keep out the light because it was considered suspicious if people wanted privacy from they neighbours. For what was there to hide? To preserve this piece of history, new tenants still are unable to shield their windows.

A scene from the old quarter of Geneva

A scene from the old quarter of Geneva

However, there are some fancier monuments to behold. The one that really impressed me was the Brunswick Monument that sits right on Lake Geneva. You would think that this Brunswick guy must have done something really effing great to merit this spectacular commemoration on such prime real estate, wouldn’t you? Well turns out, he was just some filthy rich Duke who had no family to bequeath his enormous fortune to when he died, so in 1862 he offered the city of Geneva what today would be worth 1 billion euros. His sole condition? That they build a big ass monument in his name. It’s got lions guarding it and everything. Damn.

The Brunswick Monument

The Brunswick Monument

Brunswick monument

And you know what’s even more hilarious? This custom of making a big donation with strange strings attached is fairly commonplace in Geneva! The final descendant of the Revilliod de Rive family donated his 46-acre park to the United Nations, but his catch was slightly more down-to-earth than Brunswick. The UN must ensure that his peacocks and their descendants are taken care of and able to roam freely on the grounds.

peacock united nations

The Lord of the UN grounds

I learned all of these fun facts on the Heart of Geneva tour given by Free Walk tours.  Our local guide, Alex, was really charismatic and knowledgeable. It’s a great way to see a lot of the city on the cheap (but c’mon, throw in a tip, they’re usually students).

7. I saw my best friend after two long years

Reunited with wine in hand!

The top reason why this trip was special to me was because I got to see my best friend, Andrea! This girl cannot stay in one place, and I’d get mad at her if she weren’t doing such great things. After completing a Masters in Peace Operations, Humanitarian Law and Conflict in Galway, Ireland, she’s been teaching English in Spain, giving gender equality workshops and helping women set up businesses through cooperatives in Rwanda, trying to free human rights defenders in Dublin… and finally working with the UN in Geneva. She’s a freaking superstar and I have no idea where she gets all the energy from . (She credits dark chocolate and chai tea, but I don’t buy it! 😉)

Really, Andrea, Geneva could have had a wine and cheese shortage, and I would have still had the best time. Thank you so much!

Have you reunited with a friend overseas?  What are your tips for traveling in expensive countries?

10 Tips for the BEST Vegan Burger!

Where I live, in Jerez de la Frontera, generally people don’t understand non-traditional diets. Usually when I say that I’m vegetarian, locals respond: “But you eat ham, right?” Today I got asked if I could eat mushrooms… así es la vida. The separation of food groups just doesn’t seem to be in the Spanish consciousness. So, you can imagine my surprise when I found out about a VEGAN cooking workshop held right in the center of Jerez at the natural foods store, La Panacea. For only 10 euros, I simply had to sign up!

hamburguesas veganas la panacea

How often do you see a poster for vegan workshops in little Andalusian towns?

Youtube channels such as The Happy Pear and hot for food have been my main sources of instruction so far when it comes to cooking vegan food, so it was really exciting to participate in my very first cooking class. The instructor, José taught us how to make four different and delicious burgers along with individual sauces. My favourite was the quinoa burger, and with his permission I’m sharing it with you along with 10 tips to make the ultimate vegan burger!

vegan chef natural food workshop la panacea

José, our vegan chef!

1. Salt your ingredients as you cook them.

If you add salt to the patty mixture at the end, the salt won’t absorb properly and your flavours won’t be highlighted as well.

2. Invest in the extra time and SOAK your beans.

If your veggie burgers always turn out a little soggy or mushy, try using dried beans instead of canned. It takes more time, but the texture of your patties will be firmer because you control the texture by allowing more or less cooking time. If you’re super impatient (like me), try making a beanless quinoa burger like the one at the end of this post!

veggie burger ingredients

Ingredients all lined up to be made into burgers!

3. Fry and Freeze.

If making extra for those days when you don’t feel like cooking, lightly pan fry your burgers before freezing them. This helps them to maintain their form and texture. To cook the frozen patties, pop them on the pan directly in a little oil and fry on medium heat on both sides.

4. Let your burgers chill.

If cooking them fresh, chill the mixture in the fridge before forming your burgers. This makes it easier to form compact patties that won’t fall apart when cooking.

Beet Burgers from la Panacea.

Beet Burgers from la Panacea.

5. Use rice flour.

Traditional wheat flour can make your burger taste like paste, and bread crumbs can make it heavy. Using rice flour is a lighter alternative that will also help you to get a nice crispy exterior on your patty. Bonus – It’s gluten-free!

6. Buy a knife sharpener!

As a minimalist, I try not to buy too many kitchen gadgets, but watching how easily Jose was able to slice up all the vegetables, I’m convinced that I need to purchase one. It may seem scary to use a sharp knife, but you’re less likely to cut yourself because a slick blade prevents unnecessary and dangerous slips. Because if you bleed into the burger, it ain’t vegan!

knife skills

Look at this guy! Such confidence in his knife that he doesn’t even look down!

7. Booze it up!

Add wine to unite flavours.

8. Or keep it sober.

If you prefer to be able to distinguish the taste of each individual ingredient, save the wine for you glass.

9. Make your burgers fart-free.

If you tend to shy away from veggie burgers because they turn you into a “Gassy Garry”, try using red lentils instead of beans. Because they don’t have a skin, they are easier to digest and won’t result in you emitting those embarrassing smells 😉.

quinoa veggie burger mix

No beans, no bloating, no bursts of toxic fumes!

10. Garlic is for everyone!

If you love a strong garlicky flavour in your burgers, add it last to your cooked ingredients. For a subtler garlic flavour, let it be the first thing you add to your pan (Be careful to cook on low-medium heat! Garlic burns VERY quickly!). Remove the core of the garlic if you have problems digesting it.

La Panacea Quinoa Burger, recreated at home.

La Panacea Quinoa Burger, recreated at home.

My favourite burger of the day was definitely the one made with quinoa. Gluten, bean and lactose-free, it is also the most accessible burger of the bunch. I love the fresh taste of veggies, and I can’t wait to put these on a barbecue this summer. It’s amazing paired with sriracha or vegan mayo like the one I made for Ensaladilla Rusa. However, you must try José’s secret sauce – a sweet vegannaise with pear!

Print Recipe
La Panacea Quinoa Burgers (vegan)
Beanless, and therefore fart-less quinoa burgers courtesy of José from La Panacea in Jerez de la Frontera. Served with sweet pear veganaise.
Quinoa burgers from la Panacea
Cuisine vegan, vegetarian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Passive Time 15 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
La Panacea Quinoa Burgers
Sweet Pear Veganaise
Cuisine vegan, vegetarian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Passive Time 15 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
La Panacea Quinoa Burgers
Sweet Pear Veganaise
Quinoa burgers from la Panacea
Instructions
La Panacea Quinoa Burgers
  1. Heat up a pan on medium heat with 1 tbsp of coconut oil. Add garlic and onion and sautée until translucent. Salt to help the cooking process along and to lock in this layer of flavour.
  2. Gradually incorporate about 1-2 minute apart (in this order): pepper, carrot, celery and spinach.
  3. Once your vegetables are all tender, add quinoa, cumin, salt and pepper. Cook for an additional 30 seconds. Set aside in a bowl to cool.
  4. Once cooled enough to touch, add rice flour and mix well until the mixture is homogenous. Let cool in the fridge for a minimum of 15 minutes before forming into patties.
  5. Fry on medium heat in a tablespoon of coconut oil for about 5 minutes on each side. Serve with pear veganaise.
Sweet Pear Veganaise
  1. Combine all of the ingredients except for the oil and pear in a blender. Blend, then gradually add oil until the consistency of mayonnaise is achieved.
  2. Pour veganaise into a serving bowl and fold in the pear. Serve with quinoa burgers or your other favourite veggie patty.
Share this Recipe

Do you have any secrets to making the perfect vegan burger? Have I missed anything? Let me know!

 

 

La Panacea Quinoa Burgers (vegan)

Print Recipe
La Panacea Quinoa Burgers (vegan)
Beanless, and therefore fart-less quinoa burgers courtesy of José from La Panacea in Jerez de la Frontera. Served with sweet pear veganaise.
Quinoa burgers from la Panacea
Cuisine vegan, vegetarian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Passive Time 15 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
La Panacea Quinoa Burgers
Sweet Pear Veganaise
Cuisine vegan, vegetarian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Passive Time 15 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
La Panacea Quinoa Burgers
Sweet Pear Veganaise
Quinoa burgers from la Panacea
Instructions
La Panacea Quinoa Burgers
  1. Heat up a pan on medium heat with 1 tbsp of coconut oil. Add garlic and onion and sautée until translucent. Salt to help the cooking process along and to lock in this layer of flavour.
  2. Gradually incorporate about 1-2 minute apart (in this order): pepper, carrot, celery and spinach.
  3. Once your vegetables are all tender, add quinoa, cumin, salt and pepper. Cook for an additional 30 seconds. Set aside in a bowl to cool.
  4. Once cooled enough to touch, add rice flour and mix well until the mixture is homogenous. Let cool in the fridge for a minimum of 15 minutes before forming into patties.
  5. Fry on medium heat in a tablespoon of coconut oil for about 5 minutes on each side. Serve with pear veganaise.
Sweet Pear Veganaise
  1. Combine all of the ingredients except for the oil and pear in a blender. Blend, then gradually add oil until the consistency of mayonnaise is achieved.
  2. Pour veganaise into a serving bowl and fold in the pear. Serve with quinoa burgers or your other favourite veggie patty.
Share this Recipe

Keeping up the blog (a reflection)

Since launching The Globetrotter Cookbook back in September of last year, I’ll admit it’s had its ups and downs. Writing a weekly post, sharing recipes that I feel proud of and developing stories that people want to read is intimidating. And when you only have yourself to hold to account? Even more difficult.
Sometimes I need to stop and reflect on why I started this blog. I talked to other new and seasoned bloggers about this, and found these are common struggles and insecurities.

picnic parc tete d'or lyon

I just want to eat and travel for a living… is that so hard?

One of the bloggers who reached out to me was Maria from Travel Bliss. We connected through Nomadic Matt’s Superstar Blogging Course over our love for traveling and sharing stories, but also the fact that we are new to blogging and needed some motivation. Maria sent me some questions that really got me thinking about why this project is so important to me. This post is a little different from what I normally write, and some answers are a little personal, but I hope that by sharing, this little community can grow closer.

1.     What is the inspiration for starting The Globetrotter Cookbook blog?

Anybody who knows me knows that I can’t stand so-called inspirational quotes. It basically kills me to reference Tony Robbins, but he has a quote that pinpoints the reason why I started blogging:

“Change happens when the pain of staying the same is greater than the pain of change.”

I have always been adventurous – my mom likes to remind me that as a child I would frequently “run away”, not because I was mad at her, but because I voraciously craved adventure. She even helped me pack sandwiches to take on the excursions to my hideout under a bush in the alley behind our house.

And nothing’s really changed. I moved to Spain after university to teach English, satiating my wanderlust while earning a half-decent paycheck. Fast forward to 4 years later, and I’m still here. What was meant to be a temporary “see the world” job seems to be turning into my career. Sure I like teaching, and I love my little munchkins. But when it comes down to it, teaching isn’t my passion.

esl in spain

Mauled by loving Kindergardeners… not the worst part of my job!

I was on a flight from Paris to Budapest last Spring thinking about how I could change directions. I had been “working to live” instead of “living to work” for so long that it took a little bit of pondering to remember my passions : travel, food and sharing both with friends and people I meet on Couchsurfing!

The reality is at 25, I’m starting to think more about my future and attempting to mould myself into the person I want to be. Becoming a successful blogger may be a far-off dream, but as I see it, now is the time to try. What have I got to lose?

barranquismo spain juzcar canyoning

I’m a risk-taker, just look at me jumping down this waterfall in Juzcar, Spain!

2.     What is the one special thing which drives you to travel?

Ironically, my motivation to travel stems from one of my worst qualities: my short attention span. I am easily bored, and staying in one place makes me feel confined, anxious and at the worst times, depressed. This attribute is what pushes me to travel – I constantly crave new, different experiences: moving around helps to satiate this hunger, however briefly. It does worry me sometimes that I’ll never settle down, but I’m content with burying that insecurity away for now.

toledo gardens spain

Enjoying the sun in Toledo, Spain. No need to overthink things.

3.     What are the hardships you faced in setting up your blog?

Before I started my blog, I did a lot of talking. I was so excited to share my plans for The Globetrotter Cookbook, and everyone around me seemed to think it was a stellar idea. I received so much encouragement that the day I first launched the blog, I thought it would be an instant success, at least within my in-circle. Turns out, most of my friends haven’t subscribed to receive notifications on my blog. Many haven’t even given me a “like” on Facebook. When we hang out, it’s more than obvious they don’t read my posts. How’s that for a reality check?

What I’ve learned is that although friends and family can admire and support you doing what you love, they may not actually be interested in the product, at least not to the same degree as you. And that’s fine. I believe there are people who have a genuine interest in what I’m doing, and I am determined to reach out to them.

bubble tea night market vancouver

Now if only I could get people to get as excited about my blog as I was about this bubble tea…

4.     How long do you like to travel for? What’s been your longest trip?

I am constantly travelling, and my “trips” have many different durations. For example, there are many beautiful pueblos blancos (villages where all the buildings are painted white) close to where I live, and I often pop over just to have lunch and take some pictures. Other times I wait until I have a work holiday and will jet off to Lyon, France for a week. I have also done the Camino de Santiago, which was a backpacking journey that lasted 36 days. In the summer, I’ll go back home to Vancouver, Canada and spend a couple months there. The short answer is: the duration of my trip is however long I have! Time should never be a constraint.

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Zahara de los Atunes, Cadiz, Spain

camino shared meal

Enjoying a meal with my friends on the Camino de Santiago – this is what it’s all about!

5.     How do you strike a balance between work and travel? How do manage to fund your travels?

As a part-time English teacher, time is hardly an issue when it comes to traveling. I work afternoons Monday-Thursday, so I have three day weekends as far as the eye can see! In addition, I get all of the bank holidays off (there sure are a lot in Andalusia!) plus school holidays.

gibraltar monkey

Chatting with a Gibraltar local 😉

Despite the fact that I’m well paid for my time compared to normal Spanish salaries, my income is fairly modest. I also don’t get paid for summer months when the academy closes, so I have to keep that in mind if I don’t want to work at an English summer camp (bless all of you who do, I don’t have the stamina!). I am able to afford my trips by adopting a minimalist lifestyle. I rarely buy clothes, cosmetics or other items for the sake of having them. Not only is this better for the environment and takes a stance against consumerism, it’s a lot easier to get up and move on to the next destination if you have nomadic tendencies like yours truly!

mallorca pastries

Weekend trip to Mallorca and learning how to make pastries with these locals!

6.     In your opinion, which is the best countryside destination in the world?

To be completely honest, I’m a city girl, and most of my trips have been to cities. However, I absolutely love visiting the Okanagan Valley in British Columbia. It’s surrounded by mountains and has the most gorgeous lakes. Europeans may be surprised that you can find some of the best wine ever there, and oh my god the FRUIT! Amazing. It’s a great area to for hikes and check out the wildlife, just watch out for rattlesnakes! My friend Sam has some amazing hiking recommendations in this area on her blog, Explore the Map that you should definitely check out.

penticton mountain goats british columbia

The mountain goats I snapped in Penticton, BC.

7.     How do you travel? Solo, with a partner, friends or with family?

After completing a degree which attracts internationally-minded people and having lived in 3 different countries over the past 5 years, I am lucky to have met people from all over the globe. I now choose my travel destinations based on who I know and where they’re living. It emboldens me to open my mind to towns or cities off the classic list like Paris, London, Rome (which are all still awesome, mind you). Why not Sighet in Hungary? Saint Amand Tallende in France?  Not only does this allow me to visit an old friend, it provides me with a local tour guide and sometimes even free accommodation! So essentially I travel solo, while freeloading off my pals. Just kidding, I’m a good guest and always take them out or cook them up some delicious vegetarian food!

paris eiffel tower couchsurfing

Under the Eiffel Tower with my friend, Arthur.

budapest couchsurfing

Overlooking Budapest with Zsani.

8.     Have you ever taken up a course / class like wine tasting, cheese making, photography, dance class etc. while traveling?

I did a wine tasting at the Chateauneuf du Pape winery in the Rhone Alpes region of France while I was studying in Lyon. Alas, at 20 years old on a student tour, I spent more time getting excited about being able to drink really expensive wine than savouring and trying to understand its intricacies.

9.     Which has been your favourite travel destination till date?

Yikes! It’s like having to choose my favourite child! I have such fond memories of my exchange in Lyon and picnicking in Le Parc de la Tête d’Or and rowing on the lake. I was stunned by the gorgeous gothic buildings of Edinburgh against the green rolling hills. And Berlin! The coolest city I have ever been to. You can’t make me choose! You can’t!

 

A windy day at Edinburgh Castle.

A windy day at Edinburgh Castle.

berlin gate

At the Berlin Gate.

10.    If you could change one thing about the way you travel, what would it be and why?

I am quite careless with my things, and ironically I’m the worst with misplacing my passport. The night before my trip I am always flipping my apartment upside down looking for it. It’s a nightmare, and it should be a simple correction to make… yet I never learn.

Thank you so much Maria for helping me to reflect on the reasons for why I blog!

Have you got a blog? What keeps you motivated to keep it up?

What I ate: MadrEAT Food Truck Festival

A couple weeks ago I decided to hop on the train to Madrid, and on arrival I realized how spoiled the expat lifestyle has made me. Back in 2015 after two years of teaching in Madrid, I was SO ready to leave. I felt anonymous and swallowed up in the city’s greatness. It was too busy and landlocked, making me feel claustrophobic, trapped. That’s why when I got a job offer in Jerez de la Frontera, a small little flamenco town famed for its wine and only a stone’s throw away from the beach, I couldn’t pack my bags fast enough!

Fast forward to a year and a half later living in this small town, the rhythm of flamenco shoes stomping out a buleria next door has started to lose its magic, and I find myself craving the city life again. That’s why taking the trip up to Madrid was so important for me. Irritating though it is, the grass does always seem greener on the other side!

One of the things I’ve craved most is having a variety of food. Don’t get me wrong, I love a good tapa, but tradition is so strong in Jerez that once you’ve been here a few months, you start to realize that the restaurants’ menus are almost identical to one another. The philosophy with food here is that you can never go wrong with the classics. This may be true, but my favourite part about going out to eat is trying new, innovative and creative dishes. I want to be excited by my meal.

Well I was in luck, because on arrival, I found out the MadrEAT food truck festival was in town!

food trucks in Madrid

Some of the 40 food trucks at MadrEAT.

For such a modern a city, the food truck culture in Madrid is surprisingly not as mainstream as in North America. This could be because many of the streets in the center of Madrid are narrow, and any extra space is allotted to their famed terrazas (terraces). I’m not complaining, who doesn’t want to sit out in the sun with a glass of sangria? However, the American craze hits Madrid once monthly in the spring and summer months with an event called MadrEAT, hosted by Mateo & Co. It’s not only a fun way to spend the afternoon eating and drinking, but allows new chefs to premier their restaurants and for more well-known ones to test out new gastronomic concepts.

Unfortunately for vegetarians and vegans, the meaty food culture is dominant despite Madrid’s multicultural atmosphere. That being said, I was happy to find at least one veg-friendly option at each truck, some more imaginative than others (I mean, I love avocado rolls, but c’mon, sushi has so much more potential!).

La Vermuneta

la vermuneta zorro vermut food truck madrid

Having my first glass of vermouth with my friend Tegan.

Our first stop was at the vermouth bar, La Vermuneta – a word play on “vermouth” and “camioneta” (truck in Spanish) – for an aperitif. Vermut is a fortified wine with herbal and fruity notes, and a very typical Madrileña drink.  I was excited to try a white vermouth which was had a lighter taste than the classic red. It was the perfect cocktail for a summery Saturday in March (Canadian friends, please don’t hate me!). And for 2 euros a glass, there’s no need to skimp! (I had at least four…)

Vermouth selection at la Vermuneta madreat food trucks

Vermouth selection at la Vermuneta

La Cuchara

cheese sticks food truck madrid

Leyla showing off the goods (I’m talking about the cheese sticks!)

My friend Leyla showed up with her first purchase from La Cuchara, a Venezuelan food truck :Tequeños, a.k.a. cheese sticks for the less cultured among us (confession, I didn’t know either…). I would have been satisfied with just their yummy melty goodness, but they came with a chilli dipping sauce which absolutely brought it up a level! Suffice to say, they didn’t last long.

A delicious vegetarian arepa with fresh cheese, fried plantain and guacamole. madreat

A delicious vegetarian arepa with fresh cheese, fried plantain and guacamole.

Also at La Cuchara, I ordered a veggie arepa. I had never tasted an arepa before – I liken the texture to bagel roadkill, minus the car grit. Okay, so maybe my descriptions need some refining – I did really enjoy it!

An arepa is chewy like a bagel, but flat like pita or naan. Delicious! The textures and flavours were really well-balanced – the fresh cheese was salty and chewy, the plantain was crispy, gooey and slightly sweet and the cilantro packed guacamole packed an extra punch of yum. It was a bit messy to eat, but definitely worth getting your face dirty for.

veggie arepa from la cuchara, Venezuelan food truck madreat

My first bite of arepa. As you can see, ¡me gusta!

La Trastienda

truffle croquettes from la trastienda madreat food trucks

Truffle croquettes.

It just wouldn’t be Spain without croquetas, so the La Trastienda truck was next. Yours truly fancies herself a bit pija (Spanish for posh) and pounced on a truffle croquette priced at €3.50. Yes, for one single croquette. I know, I could have purchased two alcoholic drinks for that, but shhhhhhhh.  Then again, the groans of pleasure I made gobbling it down drowned out the cries of protest from my wallet. Totally worth it.
Leave a comment if you challenge me to make a budget version at home!

truffle croquette food trucks madreat

A not so flattering picture of me sampling the croquette.

La Virgen Cerveceria

la virgen beer cerveza madreat food trucks

The selection of La Virgen beers.

I can never get enough of artisanal beer, and la Virgen provided! I tried the lager and the IPA, and they were both really refreshing and full-flavoured. I like this company a lot because it’s a small business that uses only local natural ingredients and no additives. They are also very environmentally conscious and reuse the leftover hot water from previous batches to make the next ones. Basically they tick all my boxes – refreshing, flavourful and environmentally conscious. What’s not to love?

caña la virgen food trucks madrid

Enjoying my caña 🙂

beer cerveza la virgen madrid madreat food trucks

My friends Aljaz and Zsani enjoying the IPA.

El Capitan Samosa

samosas capitan samosa food truck madreat

Samosas on display.

I was really excited to try the samosas from the El Capitan Samosa because there aren’t any Indian restaurants back in Jerez. At €1.50 per samosa, it was one of the cheaper vegetarian options at the fair. Vegans can also dig into their beetroot hummus. I tried the mushroom and the classic Indian samosa. They were tasty, but nothing like authentic Indian food. They rather reminded me of croquette filling wrapped in filo pastry. On the other hand, I really enjoyed the rice pudding samosa, which I viewed as a more successful attempt at fusion of Spanish and Indian cuisines.

beet hummus food truck madreat capitan samosa

Beetroot hummus – I didn’t purchase it because I was too full, but I loved what I sampled!

What else is there for vegetarians?

I couldn’t manage to taste everything, but here are some other vegetarian options I want to try next time at MadrEAT:

1. The Vegan Burger at Gala (shiitake mushroom burger with rucula, fried onion, vegan mayo and tartar sauce)

burgers gala madreat food trucks

 

gala caramelized onion and goat cheese burger food trucks madreat

My friend Zsani enjoying a burger with caramelized onion and goat cheese. Yum!

2.  Carrot Cake at Madalenas de colores (it looked so cute!)

3. Wine from The Flying Cow wine bar (the truck was adorable!)
flying cow wine bar madreat food trucks

If you’re in Madrid April 21, 22 or 23, be sure to check out the event at Paseo de la Castellana 89, Metro stop Nuevos Ministerios.

madreat food truck festival april

Are you into the food truck trend? What’s the best food you’ve ever eaten from a food truck? Let me know in the comments!

Nostalgia Bites: Bonding Over Bobotie

I always was nervous going to my grandparents’ house as a child. I always felt obliged to act so proper. Dinnertime was the worst, even though Granny was an excellent cook. Elbows were to be kept off the table (of course), and any minor childish misdemeanor would be met with a shrill British-accented “That’s not one of the social graces!” The gorgeous and authentic curries that graced our plates were impossible to appreciate alongside such a stressful ambiance.

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Vegetarian South African Bobotie

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Vegetarian South African Bobotie
My grandmother shared this authentic South African curry recipe with me after seeing that I gained about 20lbs eating Kraft Dinner after my first year of university. If you're going to be fat, at least eat well!
vegetarian south african bobotie
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
Ingredients
Vegetarian Bobotie
Yellow Rice
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Servings
Ingredients
Vegetarian Bobotie
Yellow Rice
vegetarian south african bobotie
Instructions
Vegetarian Bobotie
  1. Heat oven to 175 C. Soak the bread in milk, squeeze dry and crumble. Set aside.
  2. Heat oil in a pan over medium heat. Add onions and garlic and cook until softened. Toss in the ginger, sugar, curry powder and tumeric and cook until fragrant.
  3. Add seitan, crumbled bread, chutney, raisins and nuts. Season with salt and pepper. Cook for a further 5-7 minutes on low-medium heat until the flavours come together. Be careful not to overcook or it will become dry.
  4. Transfer your mixture to a greased casserole dish. Beat together the eggs, milk, salt and grated lemon rind, then pour over the seitan mixture.
  5. Bake in the oven for 45 minutes or until top has set. Serve with yellow rice.
Yellow Rice
  1. Combine water, rice, turmeric and cinnamon sticks and bring to boil over high heat. Turn to low, stir in raisins, cover and simmer for 12-15 minutes or until rice is tender. Season with salt.
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Globetrotter Gaffes: My Foggy Failure on the London Eye

If you have come here to delight in spectacular views of London, I regret to inform you that you have been misguided. The following tale is not even slightly uplifting, and the grey haze overwhelming the accompanying pictures will not inspire any #wanderlust or retweets.

To those who read this post to its tragic end, I can offer one consolation.  Such accomplishment merits a drink, and I have provided a tasty recipe that may just be enough to drag you out of your impending depression. Alas, the London Fog is not an alcoholic beverage, so you will almost immediately be met with further disappointment and woe. You’re probably best skipping this blog post altogether and visiting happier places on the internet such as here or here.

Still reading? This isn’t reverse psychology, I promise. Well, don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Foggy london eye up close

A tragically artsy-fartsy photo from my miserable misadventure.

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