The Globetrotter Cookbook

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Category: recipes (page 1 of 3)

Vegetables à Brás with The Yogi Wanderer

I love taking a peek at the gorgeous vegetarian recipes that are being cooked up around the world. Today, we’re stepping into  travel blogger, The Yogi Wanderer, Vanda’s kitchen to sample her amazing vegetarian rendition of the typical Portuguese dish, Bacalau à Brás. We instantly connected over the fact that we are both traveling vegetarians, and so I invited her to share her story and best travel tips!

vegetables a bras yogi wanderer

 

Meet Vanda!

meet vanda from the yogi wanderer

Born on the small island of Azores Archipelago, Portugal, Vanda always dreamed of exploring the world and taking a stab at living in a big city. Her first big adventure happened when she moved to Lisbon to study, and then went on to pursue a career as a journalist. But living in a big city with a steady job wasn’t satisfying. “I remember sitting on my desk at work, looking out the window and thinking, ‘There’s a whole world out there to explore!’ I felt trapped in a job and a place that didn’t feed my soul,” she tells me. She decided to do a complete 180 and jump head first into becoming a full-time yoga teacher to learn more about her purpose in life and to help others do the same.

Recently, she left Lisbon for Zurich with her boyfriend to finally quench the thirst of discovering the world outside Portugal. She writes about these inner and outer journeys on her blog, The Yogi Wanderer. Since dipping her feet into the life abroad, she has no regrets. “I think I would like to go back to Portugal one day…I miss the sun! But so far living abroad has taught me a lot about myself and the world and I wouldn’t trade this experience for anything.”

How do you travel?

gondolas Venice Italy Yogi wanderer

Taking in the gondolas in Venice, Italy.

Traveling is not always comfortable. “I’m not a backpacker, but I wouldn’t say I’m a luxury traveler. I guess I’m somewhere in the middle.” Ever the curious person, she’ll try anything once. “From camping to cruising, I can’t say no to a new experience!” Vanda also points out that although it’s a thrill to get a great deal, it’s nice to splurge on the occasional indulgence.

If Vanda could recommend one thing to travelers it would be to travel slowly. “I’ve been increasingly trying to put it into practice myself,” she laughs. “It’s easy to rush from one place to the next when you just start traveling and want to see the most of every destination. But sometimes the more you see the less you truly experience each place you visit. Traveling is not about collecting countries in your passport but authentically connecting with each location and people. As I see it, that’s also the only way to learn about the world and yourself through travel.” I couldn’t agree more.

Traveling as a vegetarian

Becoming a vegetarian was simply a natural step for Vanda after discovering Yoga and its philosophy of non violence towards other living beings. She has been an ethical vegetarian for seven years and holds the firm belief that animals are not resources born into this world for human consumption or entertainment. Plus, meat consumption is one of the main causes of climate change.

Vanda is a lot more optimistic than I am when it comes to having dietary restrictions when traveling. When asked if it affects her trips, she simply stated “No, it doesn’t affect it at all! There’s no place in the world where you can’t find some kind of vegetables or fruit, so I don’t really even think about it while I’m planning or enjoying my trips.” Her other top tip? When all is lost, find an Italian restaurant! They’re everywhere! Vanda’s favourite meal was even at an Italian/Mediterannean restaurant in Zagreb called Agava. She raves about their tagliolini pasta with pumpkin and gorgonzola cheese, cool vibe and service.

View of Zagreb, Croatia.

View of Zagreb, Croatia.

Nevertheless, when it comes to her home country of Portugal, she admits that the vegetarian food culture is still trying to catch wind and most locals find the concept altogether weird. Nevertheless, in the bigger cities like Lisbon, things are starting to change. One of the country’s most typical dishes, Bacalhau à Brás, gained its own veggie version, replacing the cod with vegetables. It’s her personal favourite, and lucky us, she’s willing to share!

Recipe time!

Ingredients for Vegetable à Brás

Ingredients for Vegetable à Brás

Vanda’s Vegetables à Brás recipe is simple, fast and oh so comforting. It is a perfect example of Mediterranean cuisine which highlights earthy veggie flavours without involving complicated spices to confuse the palate. I really recommend trying her recipe, but the beauty of this dish is that it is easily adaptable to whatever vegetables you have on hand. Delicious alone or drizzle over a little spicy Portuguese Piri Piri for a kick!

Print Recipe
Vegetables à Brás
This is a vegetarian remix of the traditional Portuguese dish, Bacalau à Brás courtesy of my friend Vanda from The Yogi Wanderer. Super quick to make and extremely adaptable to whatever veggies you need to use up in your fridge.
vegetables a bras yogi wanderer
Prep Time 5-10 minutes
Cook Time 10-15 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Prep Time 5-10 minutes
Cook Time 10-15 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
vegetables a bras yogi wanderer
Instructions
  1. Clean and thinly slice the white leek stalks. You don't need the green parts for this recipe. Chop up the mushrooms and grate the carrot.
  2. Heat oil in a pan on medium heat. Add leeks and cook until soft, about 5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt to help them break down, but not too much as the shoestring potatoes will add saltiness to the dish.
  3. Once leeks are soft, add mushrooms and grated carrot. While the vegetables are cooking, beat the eggs with a fork or whisk until the yolks and whites are blended.
  4. Once veggies are cooked through, take the pan off the heat and mix in shoestring potatoes and eggs.
  5. Garnish with chopped parsley and olives and enjoy!
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Vegan Ceviche

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Vegan Ceviche
This ceviche is colourful and oh so flavourful and you'll be shocked to find that it's completely vegan! Red onion, chili peppers, avocado and a twist of lime bring those familiar mexican flavours and textures to the secret non-fishy ingredient - hearts of palm! Best served cold and with your favourite tortilla chips, and perhaps a frozen margarita!
Vegan ceviche made with hearts of palm, courgette, red onion, chilli, avocado, lime and cilantro
Course Appetizer, lunch
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Appetizer, lunch
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
people
Ingredients
Vegan ceviche made with hearts of palm, courgette, red onion, chilli, avocado, lime and cilantro
Instructions
  1. Drain and rinse the hearts of palm. Dice them up into small rounds.
  2. Peel the zucchinis and chop into small cubes. Do the same with the avocado.
  3. Finely chop your red onion and chilli pepper. If you don't like a lot of heat, remove the seeds first. Roughly chop the cilantro.
  4. Add all of the prepared ingredients into a mixing bowl or large tupperware. Add zest and squeeze in the juice of two limes. Carefully mix together. You can add salt if you wish, but as the hearts of palm are quite salty, this may not be necessary.
  5. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for a minimum of 1 hour or overnight so that the flavours can intensify. Serve with tortilla chips and a cold beer or margarita!
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Nostalgia Bites: Bonding Over Bobotie

I always was nervous going to my grandparents’ house as a child. I always felt obliged to act so proper. Dinnertime was the worst, even though Granny was an excellent cook. Elbows were to be kept off the table (of course), and any minor childish misdemeanor would be met with a shrill British-accented “That’s not one of the social graces!” The gorgeous and authentic curries that graced our plates were impossible to appreciate alongside such a stressful ambiance.

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Globetrotter Gaffes: My Foggy Failure on the London Eye

If you have come here to delight in spectacular views of London, I regret to inform you that you have been misguided. The following tale is not even slightly uplifting, and the grey haze overwhelming the accompanying pictures will not inspire any #wanderlust or retweets.

To those who read this post to its tragic end, I can offer one consolation.  Such accomplishment merits a drink, and I have provided a tasty recipe that may just be enough to drag you out of your impending depression. Alas, the London Fog is not an alcoholic beverage, so you will almost immediately be met with further disappointment and woe. You’re probably best skipping this blog post altogether and visiting happier places on the internet such as here or here.

Still reading? This isn’t reverse psychology, I promise. Well, don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Foggy london eye up close

A tragically artsy-fartsy photo from my miserable misadventure.

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London Fog Latte

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London Fog Latte
Ironically, the London Fog was invented in Vancouver Canada. It offers a unique twist on a latte blending Earl Grey tea, vanilla and milk. Try it with coconut milk for a creamy vegan twist that compliments the floral notes of bergamot.
London Fog Latte
Course Drinks
Cuisine Canadian
Prep Time 30 seconds
Passive Time 5 minutes
Servings
cup
Ingredients
Course Drinks
Cuisine Canadian
Prep Time 30 seconds
Passive Time 5 minutes
Servings
cup
Ingredients
London Fog Latte
Instructions
  1. Fill a cup half-way with hot water, and steep your tea for about 3-5 minutes, depending on how strong you like your tea.
  2. Warm your milk in the microwave for about 30-45 seconds. If you have one on hand, use a steamer or milk frother to make it thicker in texture.
  3. Fill the cup up with the milk and stir in a drop or two of vanilla extract. Add brown sugar or sweetener if desired. Enjoy!
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Cooking with Couchsurfers: Victor from Taiwan

Victor is a wine aficionado from Taiwan, and the first Couchsurfing guest to appear in the Globetrotter Cookbook blog. He spent a month travelling through Spain, staying mostly with generous hosts who showed him the best places to sip the country’s famous vinos – from fruity red Rioja in Logroño to the dry Fino sherry in Jerez.

Victor couchsurfing taiwan

Meet Victor!

Txokos: The secret societies of Basque Country

Naturally, wine pairs best with food. While planning his trip to the Iberian Peninsula, Victor stumbled upon the secret world of txokos (pronounced tcho-koh): private gastronomical societies scattered around Basque Country. Members gather to cook, drink and socialize in restaurant-grade facilities. To participate, members bring the ingredients, and under an honour system deposit dues into a wooden box. These fees are put toward cleaning and maintaining the basic stock and supplies.

A typical txoko in Basque Country

A typical txoko in Basque Country

Victor was disheartened to learn that txokos are exclusive societies and do not open their doors to tourists. By chance, his Couchsurfing host in San Sebastian, Antonio, was a txoko member, and invited Victor along to cook with him and his friends. His  Couchsurfing experience was transformed into something even more special and authentic, proving that connecting with locals is the best way to travel!

Cooking in a txoko in Basque Country

An exclusive look into the txoko kitchen.

Couchsurfing dinner in the txoko.

Couchsurfing dinner in the txoko.

Vegetarian food in Taiwan

Sharing is my favourite part about hosting travellers – and Victor shared many interesting things about food culture in Taipai, Taiwan. I learned that not only is Taiwan home to many vegetarian Buddhists, cooking at home is not so common because kitchens are small and stocking cupboards with ingredients is less economical than eating out. Cities offer many street food stands that provide cheap food and lots of vegetarian and vegan options.

In the Couchsurfing spirit of sharing, Victor cooked me up two Taiwanese vegetable recipes straight from his mum’s kitchen.  Now, prepare for your mouths to water because I’m going to share them with you.

Taiwanese vegan rice bowl

Taiwanese veggie rice bowl

Print Recipe
Victor's Taiwanese Cabbage and Mushrooms
These vegetable side dishes were shared by my Couchsurfer friend, Victor, and are a staple in Taiwanese cuisine. Eat them alone with rice for a vegan option, or put an egg on it for extra protein and deliciousness!
Taiwanese vegan rice bowl
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Taiwanese Cabbage
Taiwanese Mushrooms
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Taiwanese Cabbage
Taiwanese Mushrooms
Taiwanese vegan rice bowl
Instructions
Taiwanese Cabbage
  1. Heat the oil in a wok or large pan to high heat. Throw in the halved garlic cloves and sautée until they are brown in colour, but not burnt (about 1-2 minutes)
  2. Add in your chilli and minced garlic and sautée for 2 more minutes, stirring frequently.
  3. Toss in your cabbage and mix together. Sprinkle with salt to help the cabbage cook down. Cook until wilted, but still crunchy (about 3 minutes). Serve with rice.
Taiwanese Mushrooms
  1. Marinade your mushrooms in the alcohol for about 5-10 minutes. This step is optional, but it will give your mushrooms a sweeter taste.
  2. Toast your ginger on medium heat for about 2 minutes, then add the sesame oil and cook for another 3 minutes.
  3. Once the ginger is tender, add in your mushrooms and sautée until cooked through (about 5-7 minutes).
  4. Season with salt to taste, and serve with rice.
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These recipes are a great addition to your travel-recipe arsenal because the ingredients are cheap and easy to find. You don’t even need soy sauce because the garlic and salt bring out all the flavour you need – I was skeptical, but trust me on this one! Both dishes are vegan, but if you are vegetarian, I strongly recommend topping your dish with a fried egg with a runny yolk. No explanation needed.

put an egg on the veg

I was a little upset that I broke my yolk for the photo, but my tastebuds sure didn’t complain!

Do you Couchsurf? What have you cooked up for your hosts? Let me know in the comments!

4 Oven-less Christmas recipes

Are you spending Christmas in hostels rather than at home? Have you only got a backpack and passport to your name? Are you going to be missing the comforts of roast dinners that normally symbolize the holidays? If you answered yes to the previous questions, I dedicate this post to you!

Food and family sum up the holidays for me, and if I can’t afford a ticket home to Vancouver this year to see my parents and sister, well I simply refuse to also forgo stuffing my gut with delicious Christmas grub.

christmas dinner

As such, I have developed FOUR holiday recipes that can be made with very few supplies, and best of all, NO OVEN NEEDED! You can make ALL of these recipes with only a frying pan or pot, a knife for chopping, a spoon for stirring, and a stove top. Each recipe calls for very few ingredients and is cheap and quick to make. Make them for your Couchsurfing host, or gather your hostel buddies together for a globetrotter Christmas feast!

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Maple parmesan green beans

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Maple parmesan green beans
An original and quick way to eat your green beans. The sweet maple syrup combined with the salty parmesan is unexpected and delicious.
Maple parmasan green beans
Course Dinner, Side Dish
Cuisine Canadian
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Dinner, Side Dish
Cuisine Canadian
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Maple parmasan green beans
Instructions
  1. Prepare your green beans by washing and cutting off the ends.
  2. Bring a medium-large pot of water to a boil. When bubbling, throw in your beans and cook until tender but still crisp (about 4 minutes).
  3. Transfer to serving bowl and toss with maple syrup. Grate parmesan cheese overtop and serve immediately.
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Boozy onion gravy

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Boozy Christmas gravy
Silky, boozy gravy that brings me back home for Christmas, even if I'm far away.
Boozy onion gravy
Prep Time 2 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Prep Time 2 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Boozy onion gravy
Instructions
  1. Heat 1 tbsp of butter and 1/2 tbsp of olive oil in a pan. Slice onion very finely, and add to melted butter and cook until translucent on medium-low heat.
  2. Stir in herbs and a pinch of salt and papper. Let cook for 2 more minutes. Add 1/4 cup of red wine and increase heat to medium until wine has reduced (about 5 minutes). Set onions aside.
  3. In the same pot, melt the remaining butter. Create a roux by adding the flour, one tablespoon at a time and whisking together. Once your roux is golden in colour, slowly pour in the vegetable broth while whisking until the gravy thickens. For a thinner gravy, add more broth.
  4. Stir in the onions and add more wine to taste. Sprinkle in salt and pepper to taste and serve over your Christmas goodies!
  5. Option: You can also blend this gravy to make it smoother.
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Pan-roasted potatoes

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Pan-roasted potatoes
Who needs an oven to achieve delicious roast potatoes? These spuds can be made anywhere, even in a hostel with sparse cooking supplies. Throw in some yams to take this dish to the next level!
xmas Pan roasted potatoes
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
xmas Pan roasted potatoes
Instructions
  1. Scrub your potatoes clean and chop into bite-sized chunks. Separate and peel your garlic cloves.
  2. Heat olive oil on medium heat in a non-stick pan. Once hot, add potato chunks, cut side down, as well as garlic cloves. Cook for 10 minutes, turning potatoes and garlic cloves occasionally so that they colour on all sides.
  3. Add rosemary and 1/2 cup of water to the pan and reduce heat to medium-low. Cover and cook until water has evaporated and spuds are tender.
  4. Season with salt and pepper and serve immediately. Best eaten with gravy poured over!
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